Assisted living centers

Choosing an assisted living home is an important decision, and one you can’t afford to screw up on. After all, it’s a long-term living situation, and comfort and satisfaction should be the top priority. So what should you look for, and what should you avoid?

Do’s

DO have realistic expectations.
Assisted living is exactly as it sounds: Community living where you are assisted with daily tasks such as meals and grooming. While some assisted living communities are fancier than others, keep in mind that what’s important is the basic level of care and comfort.

DO stay on budget.
Give yourself some budgetary wiggle room, because you never know what may pop up at the end of the month.

DO look for red flags.
Go for a tour of the assisted living community, and take note of cleanliness and staff friendliness. If something doesn’t seem right, trust your instincts.

DO let them know your dietetic needs.
Diabetics and people with allergies should report this information to the management staff, as well as any other senior care needs that should be met.

Dont’s

DON’T be mislead by the marketing phrase “aging in place.”
Seniors who have become especially sick or frail are usually asked to leave assisted living facilities for a skilled nursing facility, so the idea of aging in place isn’t really true.

DON’T just consider proximity to family.
Your top priorities should be comfort needs, safety, and affordability. If after all those needs are met, you can find a place that’s close by, even better.

DON’T move in until you’ve seen the contract.
Make sure you understand the contract before you move in to the assisted living home. Avoid being surprised by price hikes, no pet policies, and other indelicate matters. READ the fine print, and don’t assume you can trust the assisted living home.

DON’T settle for less.
Enter a flexible lease agreement and keep your eyes open for something better to come up. Keep your eyes out for exploited policies, rude behavior, and poor maintenance, and don’t be afraid to report it. Refernce materials.